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Yoh Survey: Lack of Respect, Broken Promises, and Overworking Employees Are Top Issues with Managers That Would Make Employed Americans Consider New Jobs

6238152-558409-editedRegardless of Job Satisfaction, Poor Management Could Be A Job Deal-Breaker for Many Employed Americans

PHILADELPHIA, PA October 24, 2018 – According to a new survey of more than 1,000 employed Americans conducted online by The Harris Poll on behalf of Yoh, a leading international talent and outsourcing company and part of Day & Zimmermann, a lack of respect for employees in lesser positions (53%) is a top issue with managers that would cause employed Americans to consider a new job even if they liked their current one.

Results also found that managers who break promises (46%), overwork their employees (42%) and have unrealistic expectations (42%) of employees may cause workers to consider a new job despite other positive feelings they may have about their existing role. In short, regardless of current compensation, benefits, workplace location, or office perks, having a poor manager could lead many employed Americans to explore other career options.

Additional traits of managers that would cause workers to consider other jobs include playing favorites (40%) and gossiping about other employees (39%). More than a third of employed Americans say managers who are overly critical (37%), micromanage their employees (35%), and do not listen when they voice their opinions (34%), as factors that would cause them to consider leaving their job.

Additional findings include:

  • Employed women are more likely than employed men to consider other job offers if their manager:
    • Gossips about other employees (44% vs. 34%)
    • Is ineffective at helping them develop their skills (27% vs. 20%)
  • Employees aged 55+ are more likely than those aged 18-34 to consider other job offers if their manager:
    • Is overly critical (51% vs. 27%)
    • Micromanages (43% vs. 29%)
  • In several instances, older workers, employed college graduates, and employed women are less likely to put up with a poor manager and stick with their current job compared to younger workers, employees with a high school degree or less, and employed men:
  • A manger having limited job knowledge (30%), providing inadequate performance feedback (24%), being ineffective at helping them develop their skills (23%), and not being involved in the day-to-day (18%) were also causes of considerations.
  • Employed women are more likely than employed men to say having a manager who takes credit for their work would cause them to consider a new job, even if they liked their current one (46% vs. 38%).
  • Employed women are more likely than employed men to say they would consider other jobs if management shows a lack of respect for employees in lesser positions (59% vs. 48%).
  • Employees with a college degree or more are more likely than those with a high school degree or less to consider other job offers if their manager:
    • Is overly critical (43% vs. 26%)
    • Micromanages (41% vs. 18%)
  • Employed parents of children under 18 are less likely to consider a job change when it comes to various poor manager traits compared to those who don’t have children under 18. They are less likely to consider a new job if their manager:
    • Breaks promises (40% vs. 50%)
    • Has unrealistic expectations (36% vs. 46%)

“In today’s highly-competitive workforce climate, it’s more important than ever that companies ensure their employees are satisfied with management and their jobs before it’s too late. With social media and various review sites available to prospective employees, bad behavior of managers is likely to get out – and quickly,” said Emmett McGrath, President of Yoh. “In order for companies to reduce turnover, attract and retain the very best talent for their organizations, they need to have a good hiring process, provide avenues for feedback from employees and train managers. It starts even before they are hired with how they treat job seekers, the interview and selection process, and on-boarding. Managers play a critical role every step of the way.”

 

SURVEY METHODOLOGY

This survey was conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of Yoh from September 11-13, 2018 among 2,027 U.S. adults ages 18 and older, among whom 1,043 are employed full or part time. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact Joe McIntyre at joe@gobraithwaite.com.

 

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